Absence of t(14;18) chromosome translocation in agricultural workers after short-term exposure to pesticides

Exposure to pesticides represents a potential health risk for the general population and for agricultural workers in particular. Some researchers observed that occupational exposure to pesticides is associated with risk of non?Hodgkin’s lymphoma(NHL). The chromosomal translocation t(14;18) (q32;q21) is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities in NHL. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of pesticides on t(14;18) chromosome translocation in agricultural workers after short-term exposure. Fifty-two workers occupationally exposed to pesticides (fungicides and insecticides) and 52 non-exposed were recruited. The farm workers were on average exposed to pesticides for ~3.7 h a day for 5 years. The frequency of BCL2-IGH t(14;18) translocation in workers occupationally exposed to pesticides was 10% 5 of 52) vs. 8% (4 of 52) in the control group. Overall, these data suggest that no significant association between occupational exposure to pesticides and an increased frequency of the chromosomal translocation BCL2-IGH t(14;18) in farmers was observed. However, further studies with a higher number of subjects exposed to pesticides are necessary to confirm this observation.

Authors: Rapisarda V, Ledda C, Matera S, Fago L, Arrabito G, Falzone L, Marconi A, Libra M, Loreto C. ;Full Source: Molecular Medicine Reports. 2017 Mar 24. doi: 10.3892/mmr.2017.6385. [Epub ahead of print] ;