Precautionary practices of healthcare workers who disinfect medical and dental devices using high-level disinfectants

The present study evaluated exposure controls used and to better understand impediments to healthcare workers using personal protective equipment while handling high-level disinfectants. High-level disinfectants (HLDs) are used throughout the healthcare industry to chemically disinfect reusable, semicritical medical and dental devices to control and prevent healthcare-associated infections among patient populations. Workers who use HLDs are at risk of exposure to these chemicals, some of which are respiratory and skin irritants and sensitisers. The present study evaluated exposure controls used and to better understand impediments to healthcare workers using personal protective equipment while handling HLDs. A targeted sample of members of professional practice organisations representing nurses, technologists/technicians, dental professionals, respiratory therapists, and others who reported handling HLDs in the previous 7 calendar days were surveyed. Participating organisations invited either all or a random sample of members via email, which included a hyperlink to the survey. Descriptive analyses were conducted including simple frequencies and prevalences. A total of 4,657 respondents completed the survey. The HLDs used most often were glutaraldehyde (59%), peracetic acid (16%), and ortho-phthalaldehyde (15%). Examples of work practices or events that could increase exposure risk included failure to wear water-resistant gowns (44%); absence of standard procedures for minimising exposure (19%); lack of safe handling training (17%); failure to wear protective gloves (9%); and a spill/leak of HLD during handling (5%). Among all respondents, 12% reported skin contact with HLDs, and 33% of these respondents reported that they did not always wear gloves. Findings indicated that precautionary practices were not always used, underscoring the importance of improved employer and worker training and education regarding HLD hazards.

Authors: Henn SA, Boiano JM, Steege AL. ;Full Source: Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. 2015 Feb;36(2):180-5. doi: 10.1017/ice.2014.37. ;